mountain slope cabin photoSo you’ve got an eye on building your own log cabin. The only problem? The perfect plot of land is too steep to build on.

It happens a lot. Most mountain getaways are–you guessed it–in the mountains. This means less than ideal building situations, for a number of reasons. Rocky soil, inclement weather, and cost of building supplies all contribute to the difficulty of building in the mountains. But, by golly, it can sure be worth it– often times, the places that are hardest to build offer the best views, the most outdoor adventures, and the most rewarding log cabin experience.

Then what can you do to solve this problem?

To quote Cabin Living Magazine, there are two options when dealing with slopes. You can either build on them, or live with them. The trick is, you’ve got to decide which one suits you the best for your given situation. There are some optional things you may be able to do without! On the other hand, though, there are going to be a few things you absolutely have to have, slope or no.

Basements, for instance, should be one of the first things on the chopping block when you’re building on a slope. The process and equipment needed for excavation makes digging out a basement a daunting–and expensive–process when you’re building on a slope. Both hauling in an excavator and hauling out hard rock means huge expenditure on your end.

On the other hand, you’ve got a hard choice to make when it comes to utilities. Burying lines and infrastructure for electricity, gas, and sewage means you’re going to face a lot of the same issues as basement-building, but with their own set of challenges. Instead, why not take a look at cost-saving measures like chemical toilets or solar generators? Especially if you’re looking at a weekend getaway instead of a long-term living situation, cutting down on your needs can be a great workaround for slope-building issues.

Your build-out goes beyond construction

Of course, no matter what you decide on, there’s always the issue of accessibility. Both when you’re building and after you’re done, you’ll need to consider how you’re going to make it to your cabin in the first place. Armloads of supplies or luggage can be hard to handle in the first place, but juggling those across a rocky scree-field makes for a rough start to your weekend. Think about access during construction, both for where your construction supplies should go, and where you’ll be coming in after you’re done with the build-out.

Long-term livability is key when you’re making plans for building a cabin. That means thinking of issues ahead of time, and addressing them at the outset instead of waiting until they become a problem. Building on a slope should be like building anywhere else in terms of planning– you’re just looking at a different set of variables with the same eye towards logistics!

Speaking of long-term, repairs can be a heck of a thing when you’re on a steep slope. With Tru Log’s steel siding, log cabin maintenance is made just that much easier! Take a look at what our siding can do to protect your cabin, and contact us for more information today!

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